Global Issues

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CJA/394 Contemporary Issues and Futures in Criminal Justice

Global Crime Issues
A crime is an action that is considered harmful to the welfare of the public and is prohibited by the law. Crime is a not only a national problem but also a global problem around the world. Although the effects of crime are experienced and felt in the local level, an abundance of crime is coordinated and ran internationally. This paper discusses these crimes, issues related to them, and what the criminal justice systems are doing. These international crimes are as follows. Crimes exist all over the world. The justice system department usually have the records for criminal activities in every country. There are many global crime issues and criminal justice systems are working to combat them. Terrorism.

One popular international crime is terrorism. Terrorism is the unlawful use of violence by an organized group or a person against people or property deliberately to coerce or intimidate a government or a society often for political or ideological reasons. Terrorists use kidnapping and bombing of places to intimidate or bully a target. Terrorist attacks on targets have their bases on political, ethnic, or religious issues that these organized groups oppose. Drugtrafficking.

The second criminal issue experienced internationally is drug trafficking. It is the illicit trade involving growing, manufacturing, distributing and sale of substances that are subject to drug prohibition laws. The illicit drug industry is a great threat to social stability and welfare globally (Galeotti, 2014). Illegal drugs and substances such as cocaine and heroin are produced and distributed to an organized network of drug traffickers who sell to their customers. Drug abuse, despite negatively affecting the social fabrics of the society and health situations, leads to socially unacceptable behavior and promotes disrespect for the laws.

Human trafficking.
Human trafficking is the other criminal issue that impacts criminal justice systems globally. Most victims of this crime are women and children. Human beings are taken across borders for forced labor, sexual exploitation and slavery, domestic servitude, subjecting them to the threat of violence and extreme cruelty. Human trafficking violates immigration, criminal and labor laws (Galeotti, 2014). Arms trafficking.

The other crime experienced internationally is arms trafficking. Weapons, weapon systems and their spare parts are sold on illegal arms markets to terrorism clients around the world. Black-market arms transfers do not pass through an export licensing process. Illegal arms trafficking avails dangerous weapons to unauthorized persons posing a security threat to the public since the arms fuel conflict and undermine political and military efforts in promoting security stability. Piracy.

Piracy is also a crime and a criminal issue in the world. Piracy is criminal violence or robbery at sea and off the coasts by pirates. Maritime piracy is common off the coasts of Africa and Southeast Asia and threatens the security of the most important sea lanes and the orderly flow of international maritime commercialism. Pirates are often familiar with shipping schedules, so they plot their attacks quite accordingly and hijack cargo in real time. Cybercrime.

Cybercrime is another crime impacting global criminal justice. According to Galeotti (2014) cybercrime is a criminal activity carried out by a person using a computer and the internet to disrupt operations using malicious programs, to stalk people with ulterior motives, to steal confidential information that if released would collapse an institution, or spying to obtain information from the government or a competitor or another institution. Cases of cybercrime are most common in developed countries where most of their activities are computerized and automated. Money laundering.

Money laundering also counts as a criminal issue in global operations. According...