Youth In Organized Crime

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 121
  • Published : June 21, 2014
Open Document


Text Preview
Kyle Roden
N. Peters
HSP 3U1
June 6, 2014
Youth Involved in Organized Crime
Henry T Buckle once said “society prepares the crime, the criminal commits it”. What he was trying to say is that society itself causes one to change from being innocent to guilty by breaking the law due to necessary circumstances. An example of society preparing the crime is that society gives the criminal a low socio-economic class, which causes them to have a very low standard of living; this may cause them to steal to provide for their family and survive. A very big issue in society today is crime, as youth is now getting involved in not only simple crime but also organized crime. Teens that descend from a low socio-economic background are more susceptible to being involved in organized crime. One reason a teen from a low socio-economic background would get involved in organized crime is for the need of income, another is for the teen wants to feel accepted socially, and finally out of fear and for a sense of security. One of the main reasons for a teen that comes from a low socio-economic background to become apart of organized crime is for the need of money. First, a teen would join a gang to try to make money to help provide for his or her family. If the teen is coming from a low socio-economic background it is very likely that their family does not have a lot of money. The teen could easily turn to joining a gang and earn money by completing illegal tasks to increase their family’s financial situation. A teen may also become involved in gangs due to need of income to try to get out of the low socio-economic class. To get out of the low socio-economic class, one needs money and motivation to create a better lifestyle. For them, organized crimes shows as a way of getting out of the low socio-economic class and eventually have a nicer house with a decent amount of income from the gang. Lastly, a reason income would cause the teen to get involved in organized crime is to increase status. Similar to the last point, teens would much rather be seen higher on the socio-economic pyramid, and in order to increase status you must increase income. If the teen makes a good amount of income from their organized crime group, then it is much easier to increase their social status. Indeed, the points above show that a teen would get involved in organized crime due to need of income. It is hard to fit in socially among teens today, and due to this a teen may get involved in organized crime to be accepted among his peers and society. Social acceptance would be a choice for a teen that comes from a low socio-economic background is peer pressure. Since more children that have a low standard of living are more susceptible to being involved in gangs, it is assumed that some of the teen’s friends are involved in organized crime; he or she may feel like they are forced to join as well to keep their friends. Another reason a teen would join a gang due to feel accepted socially is to fit the physical identity. In the common day, mostly teenage males but also females think it is “cool” to listen to hip/hop-rap music and act like they are tough and rugged. It is thought that a teenager would join a gang so they would fit the physical image (stereotype) of cool that is set by today’s youth and media. Finally, a teen may join a gang to feel socially accepted is due to establish their cultural identity. Similar to the previous point, media sets stereotypes for todays youth to dictate that certain cultures and socio-economic classes should have a certain image and personality. For example, as a black teenage male growing up in a low socio-economic class such as Detroit, MI. A stereotype set by media and society say that according to his low socio-economic class and culture, the male should act intimidating, dangerous, and “thug-like”. The teen doesn’t know any different and thinks it is normal act this way, so he can simply fit his gender role stereotype that was...